9.21.2012

On Autumn's Eve

Happy Friday.  You made it.  Not only is it Friday, but it is the last day of summer.  Which makes tomorrow the Autumnal Equinox (the First Day of Fall).  A glorious thing.  It appears this weekend may actually live up to it's name even - usually it's too hot or too cold to feel like the season it's supposed to be.  I'm looking out the window now, and I see the slightest change in color on the tips of the leaves outside.  We have had smells of fresh apples, sweet potato chili, and olive oil and maple roasted granola in the kitchen this week.  Breath deep, folks, this is the life.

On the docket for this weekend:  I plan to pick up a squash or two at the farmer's market tomorrow and another peck of honeycrisp for the week.  I'm making a roasted squash soup with curry to ring in the autumn joy - we're doing fondue at my sister's.  Fresh homemade brioche, sweet and sour apples for dipping, a bowl of steaming squash soup, and a bottle of home-brewed beer?  Yes, please.  What more could you ask for.

If you can't tell already, this is my season.  


So, I've been thinking a lot about autumn and about this essay I read the other day on Eden, humanity's struggle, and the persistence of memory.  The author opens with this lovely poem from Robert Frost, appropriate for the change in seasons, and poses a question I think I've always wondered, on our memory of Eden and the tenacity of both sin and goodness.

"Nothing Gold Can Stay":

Nature's first green is gold
Her hardest hue to hold
Her early leaf's a flower
But only so an hour.
Then leaf subsides to leaf.
So eden sank in grief,
So dawn goes down to day.
Nothing Gold can stay.

For all of us, Eden's loss hits hard.  A snake comes into every garden, interrupting innocence with a divorce, a death, a shaming moment, or a terrible violation.  It may have been dramatic or it may have been subtle, but whatever it was, it signaled Eden's demise, the loss of innocence.

I wonder - if Adam's sin courses through my veins, perhaps so does his memory of Eden.  Could that be what it means to have "eternity written in our hearts?" - that we've been there before and its goodness has been imprinted on our souls?

1 comment:

  1. This is beautiful! I love fall too, and I love your reflections on it. Great line: "We've been there before and its goodness has been imprinted on our souls."

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